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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,913 (some duplicates have been removed)
the governments and the companies between the two sides. as the largest economy in the u.s., california boasts the resources and a strong advantage in high tech, bio-science, agriculture, fisheries, and the forestry, and even tourism. and in terms of cooperation with china, california enjoys exceptional economic, cultural, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisco are also making co
. if you see the u.s. banks pull back on lending we'll have problems. >> to victoria's point. then europe and china matter more on the u.s. economy. what do you think? >> i think we were so burned by the 2008 melt down that many people didn't see we overdo the threat on the horizon. victoria is right. it takes a couple of 10ths of a point and we are perilous close to a rescission. i don't think it is a big event. rick, they are worried about the fiscal christs and we have a capitol strike going on. u.s. treasuriers saying we are parking 50 percent of the debt in u.s. backings. isn't that poor of problem. >> we hear the bad news and it makes us nervous . victoria hit the fact on the nose. two percent of the gdp comes from the sales.own yes, recessin highly unlikely. what does worry me. u.s. banks have far more exposure to the european front than we are told. it is a credit crunch we could do without. >> i think mike hasn't heard the news yet. the u.s. housing market bottomed on tuesday . more good news, because costs are low in the u.s. we are bringing manufacturing back to the u.s.. there
through these difficult times. when the company urged -- merge with u.s. airways in 2005, parker took a new set of challenges on as the ceo of the newly restructured legacy alive. u.s. airways is a company built on mergers and acquisitions, which is a fitting for dug parker, the industry's main advocate for consolidation. he has argued time and again the airlines can be more flexible, more capable, and more valuable to travelers if they join forces . the airlines that did so are now operating successfully. mr. parker believes the combining u.s. airways and american airlines would create a more competitive industry and a more sustainable airline. so far his plan has received widespread support, including and, perhaps, surprisingly from the workers and american airlines and the union. he is here today to tell us more about the merger and where it sits and to his broader vision for the industry as a whole. ladies and gentlemen, please join me in welcoming dug parker to the national press club. [applause] >> thank you. thank you, all of you, it was very nice. i will say to my not a good p
to them. president r the president and ceo of the u.s. chamber of commerce and the american petroleum institute that all of the major producers are partners. jay timmons, president and ceo of the national association of manufacturers and the chairman and ceo of verizon. thank you for being with us. say hello. >> thank you, mr. chairman and join you in welcoming our distinguished panel of industry leaders. i appreciate especially their efforts on behalf of the law of the sea and willingness to explain how the convention will help them create private sector jobs and every major ocean industry including shipping, fishing, telecommunications, oil and energy gas and the united states succession to the law of the sea treaty. this is not a support and has been unanimous going back to 2003. we initiated the process that resulted in the committee vote to hospital law of the sea to the senate on that occasion. a few years later at a foreign relations committee hearing on october 4, 2007, a business panel identified and only that powerful unequivocal testimony, but the major industry backed at t
out for this horrible weather. do i think this is u.s. leadership that has been affected? >> given the alternatives, sure. we can all point to plenty of places where we have made lots of mistakes. the most obvious ones involved the loss of american lives. when i think about -- when i think about u.s. leadership, as the world's superpower and i think about us-led architecture, i am not just looking at the last 10 or 20 years. i'm thinking about that post world order. well, think of what happened to japan and europe in that order. think about the marshall plan, i think that is very effective for u.s. leadership. i think about the breton woods and the institution and the reflections of the exceptionalism of the united states. that brought our allies together. a series of institutions that reflect our political and economic values and priorities. it did drive the process of globalization from us-led globalization. if i was to give us a grade from zero to 10, it would be pretty positive. but it is over. it is over. >> when did it start becoming over? >> and started becoming over what th
as much more collectivist this. it seems hard for us to imagine. he saw the u.s. as a group of people who like to form associations. who wanted to always be with other people. after he went to the u.s., he saw the french as the individualists. from that, he concluded that he was going to put up his colossal statute. he was going to have to say something to people who understood themselves as a big group. as a society. as a collective entity. >> watch this whole event as part of our lineup. it includes a discussion on how social media has changed the news coverage. commencement speeches from new york mayor, cory booker, and he long must -- elon musk. that starts at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we had pulled into the spot that morning. >> the former commanding officer of the u.s.s. cole on the events surrounding al qaeda's october 2attacks. >> i was doing routine paperwork when there was a thunderous explosion. you could feel all 505 feet and 8,400 tons of destroyer thrown up to the right. it is like the home in the air while the ship was doing this three dimensional twisting. we came ba
christs and we have a capitol strike going on. u.s. treasuriers saying we are parking 50 percent of the debt in u.s. backings. isn't that poor of problem. >> we hear the bad news and it makes us nervous . victoria hit the fact on the nose. two percent of the gdp comes from the sales. slow down yes, recession highly unlikely. what does worry me. u.s. banks have far more exposure to the european front than we are told. it is a credit crunch we could do without. >> i think mike hasn't heard the news yet. the u.s. housing market bottomed on tuesday . more good news, because costs are low in the u.s. we are bringing manufacturing back to the u.s.. there is a 50-50 chance we'll repeal obama care. >> not a chance. >> greece is about the size of connecticut and maybe it will not affect the u.s. economy. if our banks had taken the time to shore up the balance sheet. you think what matters most is washington d.c. policy. who is going to be elected president is going to matter a lot . what is happening in congress is a big wild card here . europe, i am not as worried about europe. i agree w
is cooling, we look at what the slowdown means for u.s. corporate earnings, and the global economy. >> susie: and one company is making a big push into china, marriott international, a look at its latest earnings and strategy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" >> tom: markets were clearly disappointed today the federal reserve does not seem ready to act right away to boost the economy. minutes from the fed's june meeting show only a few policy makers wanted to expand a bond buying program known as quantitative easing to lower interest rates and boost the economy. but as darren gersh reports this is now really a question of timing. >> reporter: the fed was not willing to give markets an immediate monetary fix, but the latest readings from its policy making committee show a couple more lukewarm reports on the labor market might change that. >> and if these employment reports are still weak like this last one, i think a strong case could be made for the fed to expand its balance sheet and try to support the economy more. so, at that point it will be clear that the recovery has stalled
the globe take action to boost their sagging economies. should more be done in the u.s.? >> susie: i'm susie gharib. getting new medicines to market faster. speeding up the government's drug approval process. why investors and patients are on board. >> tom: and "made in america" tonight, a craft beer company brewing up a national expansion. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the global economy was the hot topic in markets around the world today. central banks in europe, the u.k., and china announced moves to boost growth. the european central bank lowered interest rates to an all-time low. china cut several key interest rates for the second time in a month. and the bank of england held its rates steady, but said it will pump billions of dollars into its economy through a new round of bond buying. here in the u.s., some hopeful signs for the weak job market. private employers added 176,000 new workers to their payrolls in june, stronger than the previous month. and the labor department said the number of people filing for unemployment benefits dropped by 14,000 in the past
americans and others but when i think about u.s. leadership with the u.s.-led architecture not the last 10 are 20 years but think about what happened to japan in that order. and the marshall plan. talk about the united nations with the exception lonesome of the united states with the political and with the globalization of process. on balance but it is over. >> when did it start becoming over? >> with the rise of the emerging markets. that is not the problem. it is the rise of the other. when japan and europe rose we did not have that problem. you don't just have day coordination problem but to putin did not come to the camp david summit. and frankly that is a good thing. it would have then a tough meeting to normalize the trade status which nobody once frankly but with syria or iran. >> i am very disappointed as well. g-7 plus one. if you go to a wedding, take her wrong. -- along. but to get back to the initial question, it started to erode the globally because all these institutions the world series sums global and it behooves us to say that but. >> but when day start to break down it wa
. >> an to calcutta, india. sex workers are barred from entering u.s. and holding alternative conference. we will take a look at the aids epidemic in black america and speak with congress member barbara lee of california. >> we need to make some noise. we need to put eradicating hiv and aids at the front burner of our political agenda, both here and abroad. >> all that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. syrian troops continue to bombard the city of aleppo in a bid to reclaim areas held by rebel forces. there have been reports of syrian helicopters backed by fighter jets firing from above, forcing hundreds of residents to flee. and allepo resident said syrian forces had fired indiscriminately, killing civilians. >> two brothers and their uncles were killed, another is between life and death. tend shells on a daily basis and this village has not had any sign of armed groups. we are targeted only because we call for freedom. >> speaking in washington, secretary state clinton said of killing of syrian president bashar al-assad is inev
>>> the road to kabul. pakistan agrees to reopen the supply routes to afghanistan. u.s. and pakistani leaders have come to agreement that will help nato soldiers to wrap up the mission in afghanistan. they agreed to reopen the routes to pakistan. the u.s. uses the roads to bring in goods and fuel. secretary of state hillary clinton discussed the details over the phone with the pakstani foreign minister. >> the foreign minister karr has advised her the ground lines of communication will be reopening. >> u.s. troops in afghanistan killed 24 pakistani soldiers in error last november in a cross-border air strike. pakistani blocked the supply routes. clinton offered an apology and expressed the condolences to the families of the dead soldiers. the islamic extremist group, the pakistani taliban criticized the agreement. members threat tuned attack u.s. convoys. nato leaders said the agreement demonstrates strengthened cooperation between their forces and pakistan. the signed treaties with other central asian countries to provide access into afghanistan, but those roadways pro
executive arnie gundersen about the report and what it means for u.s. plants. then a look at serious operations in africa and how the united states rendered, tortured and discarded one innocent man from tanzania. and protests against the u.s. mining giant newmont are escalating in peru. five participants in those protests have been killed in the past week. a state of emergency has been declared. >> the government is mistaken if it thinks it is going to crash the justified cries of the people. >> we will speak with amy goodman in spain today, 75 years after the bombing of that city. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm juan gonzalez. i am filling in for amy goodman. the u.s. and european union are calling for new sanctions on syria similar to those used against the gaddafi regime ahead of the nato attack on libya. at an international friends of syria gathering in paris, secretary of state clinton invoked the threat of chapter 7 under the u.n. charter, which ranges from economic embargos to military force. the news co
the syrian forces have started moving chemical weapons from storage facilities. though u.s. officials refuse to speculate whether the assad regime is preparing to use those chemical weapons. this move comes a day after one of the worst massacres there since the start of the uprising. our chief foreign correspondent richard engel just back from there is with us in the studio this evening. >> a u.s. official tells us over the last several days syria has been moving some of its chemical weapons. u.s. officials don't know exactly why but there are reports that the syrians are moving the chemical weapons from one location to a slightly more secure location. any time a government that is accused of massacring its own people including at least a hundred people yesterday starts moving chemical weapons it is obviously a cause of great concern. [ chanting ] >> reporter: many syrians want to know how many more massacres must happen before outside help arrives. protesters across syria accuse the army and pro assad militia of getting in and carrying out atrocities. the latest massacre began according to
assistance and no u.s. dollars and there were global fund dollars available for hiv and the prospects of her living and what she's doing now in her community because those dollars are at work there in her community are tremendous. there are 5.5 million people approximately in the world in low and middle income countries that receive hiv treatment and are on retrovirals because of foreign assistance programs funded by the united states and by other donor countries and especially the global fund. when we asked the question getting back to the title of the panel, to aid or not to aid. do i think we have to aid? yes, i think we have to aid. it is in the best interest as a country and it is our right and our responsibility as one of the world's global leaders. is it -- could it be more effective? absolutely. should we fund more? i think so, but right now we're living in a time in history where the world is changing more than ever before and millions of people still live in extreme poverty. we know that extreme poverty and social and economic conditions breed fear, hopelessness and terror, frankly
.n. security council after russia and china, again, exercised their veto power. the u.s. ambassador t tthe united nations says russia and china are protecting the syrian president and that thousands of civilians uld die as a result. susan rice spoke after the russian and chinese representatives at u.n. security council vetoed the latest resolution on the conflict in syria. the draft would have permitted nonmilitary sanctions if president assad's government refused to stop using heavy artillery within ten days and the resolution called for a 45-day extension of the u.n. cease-fire observers mission. the current term expires on friday. it's a third time russia and china have vetoed u.n. resolutions on syria. >> the security council has failed utterly. this is another dark day in turtle bay. one can only hope that one day, before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow -- >> western nations are expected to try to dlaft another resolution to extend the mission of the u.n. cease-fire observers. u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon regrets the securi
under scrutiny. a go is expthis summer. car the eel headline customers in in the u.s. are the lookinging op uchida joinsat are you hearing from people? >> we often hear about car china,ailand. now we're are betting their futu the ar industry has despite the japan's motors joinrces two years aet up now their have production.he plant churning out 12 per year. times their initialutives at mitsubishi use the market stf triggered aussian car sales. 1.5 mi about half of the year the sector signs of though.smen sold about 2.6 million investors around taking a wait attitude on wednesday were close independence day. ended ahead of policyuropean central ba bank of details of are tra morning here inre going to mellegard at prettyditions the u.s. on he stockstoday? >> in the u.s. focus was european lot oftocks which throughout the week the sector also resignationceo. nikkei topix are kic thursday, ju and both ind the nik9,000 at nikkei higher for two a row.ocus today autos. data fes for thes fis well as earnings for operator chain focus on as branch mana
condition. it was the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since the killings of 32 people at virginia tech five years ago. we'll have more on the store after the headlines. syrian rebels continue to make gains on the regime of bashar al-assad, seizing a number of border crossings with neighboring iraq and turkey. opposition fighters overrun government forces at two major crossings, including one controlling the vital trade route on the damascus to baghdad highway. meanwhile, the syrian government says the country's intelligence chief, hisham ikhtiyar, has died from injuries sustained in wednesday's bombing of a high- level meeting in damascus, making him the fourth assad regime insider to die in the attack. and it's the violence, the united nations is warning 1 million syrians are now believed to be internally displaced, double the previous estimate. the fighting continues in syria one day after russia and china vetoed a security council resolution threatening new sanctions on the syrian regime. russia and china say they took action over demands for the inclusion of penalties under chapter seve
firml negotiating rights last u.s. partner saying it will be used as political campaign. parliament's approval of the support for fukushima daiichi plant in japan. >>> public support for nuclear energy in demonstrators held their latest post-fukushima protest aimed at pressuring the government to rally was 2011 disaster. >> reporter: they brave heat and humidity to come out in historic numbers. these protesters in tokyo are demand thousands of people are here to say no power. >> translator: nuclear power is too dangerous humans inred explosio is still otest after protest urging the government to stop using atomice and academy award winning musician. they told the crowd life and health are much more important than economic people came out today to lis their own government stop restarting nuclear plants and decommission them. things. when i think about my child and other children in fukushima, i cannot help butt shame for all japanese if another nuclear accident happens again. really angry. this is terrible politics that politicians play. >> reporter: government
on small arms or ammunition.guns are very popular in the u.s. a new pollhouseholds own a gun. somernational law that might, inright to arm themselves. the biggest on and produces overr. the country has resiston in the scope of the tr impractical. raised concerns.e countries are also among theorters. negotiations o for most of this month. negotiators say is not if there will be a treaty bu nhk wo >>> delegates from iran an meet in istanbul round of talks on iran's nucleare eu's foreign policy chief has urs this time. the seven times since the eu's catheri she hopes the iranianse concerns of the internnian , which can lead to them they're ology for peaceful purpo istanbul to de fu but the meetings are be strained.bargo on iranian oil im >>> the u.s. authoritiesns in place developing its nuclear crude exports and institutions to stop d country. seeing there for foodcine. they are also world irani emergency at anitade the landing without its disaster. the told going on co but the showed the ran air passenger crashed into the northercountry. bo both u.s. manufac
're gains on glo extended gains third to more the meeting. u.s. sto rose on orders with dow climbing to a high higher at 12,9 we go mellegard at markets wrappingy in the p the fourth holiday. ed markets in the cheer out of factorieshat came out. posit u.s.rkets. how all this wednesday july positive start and the780percent. the nikkei to in t given the u.s.holiday. have beentyf late volatil the gold and oil we have been. we d higher in prices as well as a volatility in gold ng atrude oil t up new yorkexchange arou concerns about supply afterbout sancti effect in this waswti around rkets aree volatility here in had not with -- oil some ofwell. that's for ng at the story stocks.dollar/yen currently upper levels and bit of there on the as well.of the european central currently trading expected to cut percent. ramin. on nvestors look forreopen on well we some there because there's still data for out sector ser sjob. on friday for >> lot, ramin mellegardokyo now, the international monetary f warned the u.s. government a imled on review its b measures. downsidefor th
talks about u.s.-pakistan relations. "washington journal" is next. ♪ ♪ host: good morning. as the july 4 recess comes to a close, congress is returning this weekend the house is looking for more debate over the farm bill and it already passed the u.s. senate and a scheduled vote wednesday on a repeal of the affordable care act known as obama care following the ruling last week by the supreme court. it is sunday, july 8 and will begin with our focus on u.s. foreign policy and hillary clinton who is in tokyo today for a series of talks on the u.s./nato role in afghanistan or the next decade. will get your calls and comments about u.s. foreign policy generally and the performance of the secretary of state, hillary clinton specifically. our phone lines are open -- you can join the conversation on our twitter page and facebook. or send us an e-mail. there are a couple of articles related to the secretary of state and this one is from cbs news. she beat the former record held by madeleine albright. there is this from "the l.a. times." she was asked about corruption in the country. she said it
, making june 1 of the bloodiest since u.s. forces withdrew late last year. syrian president bashar al-assad has expressed regret for the downing of a turkish air jet that stoked tensions with neighboring turkey last month. speaking to a turkish newspaper, al-assad said he will not allow the incident to escalate into combat between the two countries. in other syria news, dozens of members of syria's opposition met in cairo on monday to formulate a new transition from al-assad's rule. syrian rebels boycotted the gathering, calling it a potential front for foreign intervention. syrian forces meanwhile continue to bombard the damascus suburb of douma with heavy shelling. at the united nations, navi pillay said the arming of both sides of the syrian conflict is creating a dangerous situation. >> there is a risk of escalation with provision of arms to the civilian government and to its opponents, fueling the violence. any further militarization of the conflict must be avoided at all cost. >> and other syria news, human rights watch has released a report accusing the assad regime of widespre
monetary fund says the u.s. economy is recovering, but it's still very fragile. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, armed with an i.m.f. report issued today, christine lagarde warns that u.s. policy-makers must be careful not to overdo debt reduction. >> to bring the debt under control, action needs to be taken over a period of time. that is not just next year. that is going to extend for the next ten years. it needs to be gradual, not so contractionary that the economy folds. >> woodruff: we have an update on efforts across the country to recover from wildfires, extreme heat, and power outages. >> brown: susan dentzer of the journal "health affairs" answers questions many of you are asking about how health care reform will work, now that the supreme court has weighed in. >> for somebody who is running a small business, what does this new health care plan... how does that impact future busess owners? >> brown: margaret warner interviews mexico's new president-elect, enrique peÑa nieto, about drug war violence and relations with th
. >> that's right. the libor investigation is reportedly set to zero in on individual traders in the u.s. and europe as officials prepare to file criminal charges in the next few weeks. u.s. prosecutors have begun notifying lawyers arresting could be imminent. meanwhile regulators in europe are focusing on a ring of traders at several banks and are probing emails for signs ever collusion. barclays is trying to resolve its leadership crisis. a number of parts in uk press said barclays investment bank has pulled out of the ceo race. the bank's deputy chairman also turned down the chance to become chairman despite shareholder support. it appears to be the job that no one wants. >> why would you? >> right. >> you won't get thanked for it. >> the uk, public, and, you know -- >> again, you have to take it like rbs, the man has got nothing but opium poured on him. why would anyone want to change the culture. >> that makes you wonder too about governance, the world's biggest financial institutions going forward. are they getting the right person for the job. >> the atmosphere has become so poiso
such as the united states. the u.s. is the world's biggest weapons exporter, accounting for one-third of the total value of global arms shipment. washington initially opposed the treaty. but president obama reversed that position. his administration is not so forthcoming on some of the scope of the treaty, though, such as small arms or ammunition. guns are very popular in the u.s. a new poll indicates more than 40% of american households own a gun. some lawmakers resist any international law that might, in their view, infringe american people's constitutional right to arm themselves. the u.s. is also the biggest exporter of ammunition and produces over seven billion rounds a year. the country has resisted the proposed inclusion of ammunition in the scope of the treaty on the ground that it is impractical. russia and china have also raised concerns. the countries are also among the world's largest arms exporters. negotiations over this global arms treaty will go on for most of this month. negotiators say now the question is not if there will be a treaty but how effective or not it will be. nhk worl
straight day due to more optimism following the eu summit meeting last week. u.s. stock prices also rose on factory orders with the dow jones industrial average climbing to a two-month high ending over half a percent higher at 12,943. for more we go to ramin mellegard at the tokyo stock exchange. so the u.s. markets wrapping up the day in the positive ahead of the fourth of july public holiday. >> yes, indeed, ai. markets in the u.s. taking good cheer out of the factories order data that came out. also positives from the u.s. european markets. let's see how all of that is trading in this wednesday july 4th. positive start here. and the topix 780 up half a percent. the nikkei did manage to close in the positive today. it may trade given the u.s. will be on holiday. however, we have been following the commodity markets of late and a bit of volatility there in the gold and oil markets. we have been focusing on that. we did see a surge higher in crude oil prices as well as a volatility in gold prices. just looking at wti crude oil prices there, it shot up on the new york america tile exchang
here tomorrow. ♪ >> john: another u.s. apology. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> john: good evening. i'm john roberts in for bret baier. pakistan in the seven-month long blockade in the boarder with afghanistan that cost the american taxpayer $2 billion. it took an american apology which the pentagon and the administration have said for months would not be forthcoming. national security correspondent jennifer griffin has details. >> reporter: the apology came from hillary clinton in a phone call to pakistan foreign minister. "we are sorry for the losses suffered by pakistani military. we are committed to working closely to pakistan and afghanistan to prevent this from ever happening again." for seven months, the white house, state department and pentagon said they would not apologize for the cross-border shooting incident on novembe november 26 that left 24 pakistani troops dead. and balked at any suggestion they apologized in the aftermath. >> it was obviously no apolog apology. >> u.s. military investigation ordered by the top general in afghanistan found that the pakistani forces ha
.4% in the second quarter. there's a surprise 2.2% jump in inflation. >> hsbc is to post a jump. >> u.s. investors are looking ahead to a busy week. >>> okay. so welcome to the first trading day of the week. we're weighted to the upside one hour in the trading session for europe. after of course big rallies on the last few trading sessions of last week. the ftse 100 down half percent last week but up 2% the last three trading days. up 4.68% in the last three trading days. ftse 100 up. dax up two-thirds. the ibex today up another 1.75%. italy has got an auction out this morning. the auction focusing on -- i was going to show you three. but we got five and ten years very much in auction as well. 5.97% is where the ten year is trading. auction last month, the yield was 6.19%, lower today. the italian five year trading 5.28 at auction last month they hit 5 policy 84. auctioning up to 5.5 billion. yields in spain remain at 6.649%. hundred basis points lower. ten year bunds up to 1.4%. treasuries hit a record low. big week with the fed and employment report and of course the ecb, bank of england as well
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,913 (some duplicates have been removed)